Sat Nov 1 19:26:33 SGT 2014  
HEPATITIS
B
    Hepatitis B, Jamaica
Within 3 days after unprotected sex, stop HIV infection with Post-Exposure Prophylaxis treatment 10 days after unprotected sex, detect HIV infection with the DNA test 28 days after unprotected sex, accurately detect HIV infection with the 20 minute rapid test
Full & comprehensive sexually transmitted disease testing
Males: do not urinate for at least 4 hours before arriving
Females: testing is more accurate when you are not menstruating

Hepatitis B, Jamaica

Summary

Hepatitis B, Jamaica @hepatitisb_biz: Hepatitis B symptoms in men/women, screening/diagnosis, testing/check and treatment, Jamaica - Private and confidential service.

Keywords: Hepatitis B Jamaica, Jamaica Hepatitis B, Hepatitis B.

Description

Advertisement: Come to sunny Singapore to have your testing and treatment. Singapore Ministry of Health registered general practice (GP) clinic:
SHIM CLINIC
HIV STD TESTING TREATMENT™
168 Bedok South Avenue 3 #01-473
Singapore 460168
Tel: (+65) 6446 7446
Fax: (+65) 6449 7446
24hr Answering Tel: (+65) 6333 5550
Web: Hepatitis B, Jamaica
Opening Hours
Monday to Friday: 9 am to 3 pm, 7 pm to 11 pm
Saturday & Sunday: 7 pm to 11 pm
Public Holidays: Closed
Last registration: one hour before closing time.
Walk-in clinic. Appointments not required.
Bring NRIC, Work Pass or Passport for registration.

Budget airlines based in Singapore:

Budget airlines operating in Singapore:

Sexual risk (of HIV/STD/pregnancy), and what you can do before and after exposure.

Timeline Event / Available resources
HIV STD Pregnancy
Before exposure
Abstain from sex, Be faithful, or Condom use
Circumcision (males only)
Contraception
(females only)
HIV PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) STD vaccine:
- Hepatitis vaccine
- HPV vaccine
STD / HIV exposure
Unsafe sex / unprotected sex:
No condom / Condom broke / Condom slip
0-72 hours HIV prevention
HIV PEP (post-exposure prophylaxis) treatment
- Stop HIV infection after exposure.
STD testing
If STD symptoms appear, then do STD treatment.
- Males: Do not urinate for at least 4 hours before arriving.
- Females: testing is more accurate when you are not menstruating.
Emergency contraception
(females only)
2 weeks HIV DNA PCR test
1 month 20 minute SD Bioline HIV Ag/Ab Combo HIV rapid test:
- Fingerprick blood sampling.
3 months 20 minute OraQuick® HIV rapid test:
- Oral saliva or
- Fingerprick blood sampling.
Full & comprehensive STD testing
- Males: Do not urinate for at least 4 hours before arriving.
- Females: testing is more accurate when you are not menstruating.

Location reference


Latest News

Hepatitis B: future curative strategies
Fri, 31 Oct 2014 20:53:13 +0100 | Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases
Purpose of reviewHepatitis B virus (HBV) causes a large proportion of chronic liver disease worldwide. The limited efficiency of current treatments based on the use of nucleotide/nucleoside analogues or interferon-alpha requires the development of new therapeutic tools for the treatment of chronic HBV. We summarize the most recent therapeutic strategies designed to directly target HBV-infected hepatocytes or to restore antiviral immunity during chronic HBV infection.

The relationship between fibrosis level and blood neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio in inactive hepatitis B carriers
Fri, 31 Oct 2014 20:22:28 +0100 | European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
ConclusionIn inactive hepatitis B carriers, the histological activity index and NLR were found to be correlated negatively. NLR can be used as a predictor of fibrosis in combination with other noninvasive markers. (Source: European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology)

Clinical usefulness of mean platelet volume and red blood cell distribution width to platelet ratio for predicting the severity of hepatic fibrosis in chronic hepatitis B virus patients
Fri, 31 Oct 2014 20:22:27 +0100 | European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
ObjectiveHepatitis B virus infection is still one of the leading causes of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. Liver biopsy is the gold-standard method to assess the severity of liver fibrosis, but the invasive nature of this method limits its usage. Currently, noninvasive parameters are utilized to estimate liver histology. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between the severity of fibrosis and red blood cell distribution width (RDW), platelet distribution width (PDW), mean platelet volume (MPV), and MPV and red blood cell distribution width to platelet ratio (RPR) in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB).

Liver Safety Assessment: Required Data Elements and Best Practices for Data Collection and Standardization in Clinical Trials
Fri, 31 Oct 2014 00:00:51 +0100 | Drug Safety
Abstract

Liver Safety Assessment in Special Populations (Hepatitis B, C, and Oncology Trials)
Fri, 31 Oct 2014 00:00:46 +0100 | Drug Safety
Abstract

Does suppression of HBV replication by antiviral therapy confer the same benefit as host immune control of HBV?
Fri, 31 Oct 2014 00:00:00 +0100 | Gut
This study... (Source: Gut)

Patients with chronic hepatitis B treated with oral antiviral therapy retain a higher risk for HCC compared with patients with inactive stage disease
Fri, 31 Oct 2014 00:00:00 +0100 | Gut
Conclusions

Single‐nucleotide substitution of Hepatitis B virus in intrauterine infection
Thu, 30 Oct 2014 05:57:18 +0100 | Journal of Viral Hepatitis
Summary

Twenty-eight day safety, antiviral activity, and pharmacokinetics of tenofovir alafenamide for treatment of chronic hepatitis B infection
Thu, 30 Oct 2014 00:00:00 +0100 | Journal of Hepatology
Tenofovir alafenamide, a phosphonate prodrug of tenofovir with greater plasma stability than tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, provides efficient delivery of active drug to hepatocytes at reduced systemic tenofovir exposures. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)

Clinical outcomes of hepatitis B virus coinfection in a United States cohort of hepatitis C virus‐infected patients
Wed, 29 Oct 2014 00:00:00 +0100 | Hepatology
Conclusion: We found that while only a small number of HCV patients were coinfected with HBV, patients with documented HBV viremia were at a significantly higher risk for cirrhosis, HCC, and overall death than HCV monoinfected patients. Absence of HBV replication was associated with a clinical course similar to that of HCV monoinfected patients. (Hepatology 2014) (Source: Hepatology)